100Gb Ethernet transceivers, modules and form factors on Cisco products

100Gb-Ethernet

At the time of the 400Gb Ethernet interfaces introduction, here is a summary of the different form-factors, transceivers and modules available for 100Gb Ethernet on Cisco devices. As you will see below, there are many different types of 100Gb Ethernet transceivers. And each type have its own functional mode. In a next article, I will try to explain the differences between them and will give more details about the most common: the QSFP-28.

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Multicast lab 5: Source-Specific Multicast (SSM)

After giving a two-days training to a customer on multicast technology, I take the opportunity to have my lab and the configurations ready to share with you a suite of five different multicast configurations examples. And, how to make some tests and troubleshooting. These examples are based on the labs I used to practice the CCIE R&S practical exam.

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Multicast lab 4: Any-Source Multicast with Bootstrap Router (BSR)

After giving a two-days training to a customer on multicast technology, I take the opportunity to have my lab and the configurations ready to share with you a suite of five different multicast configurations examples. And, how to make some tests and troubleshooting. These examples are based on the labs I used to practice the CCIE R&S practical exam.

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Multicast lab 3: Any-Source Multicast with anycast RP

After giving a two-days training to a customer on multicast technology, I take the opportunity to have my lab and the configurations ready to share with you a suite of five different multicast configurations examples. And, how to make some tests and troubleshooting. These examples are based on the labs I used to practice the CCIE R&S practical exam.

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Multicast lab 2: Any-Source Multicast with auto RP

After giving a two-days training to a customer on multicast technology, I take the opportunity to have my lab and the configurations ready to share with you a suite of five different multicast configurations examples. And, how to make some tests and troubleshooting. These examples are based on the labs I used to practice the CCIE R&S practical exam.

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Multicast lab 1: Any-Source Multicast with static RP

After giving a two-days training to a customer on multicast technology, I take the opportunity to have my lab and the configurations ready to share with you a suite of five different multicast configurations examples. And, how to make some tests and troubleshooting. These examples are based on the labs I used to practice the CCIE R&S practical exam.

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Site-to-site VPN tunnels between Meraki MX and Cisco ASA

As I wrote on my recent post here, I was involved into a project to implement a Meraki MX into the Azure Cloud. This project also includes a migration phase with site-to-site VPN tunnels between Meraki MX and Cisco ASA. Even if the “Non-Meraki VPN peers” are supported on the Meraki MX, you may have some surprises with the Cisco ASA. Here are some tips to avoid problems and save you time. The tests below have been made with MX version 14.31 (in beta at the time I write this…

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How to deploy a Cisco Meraki vMX100 into Microsoft Azure

Recently, I was involved into a project where we had to deploy a Cisco Meraki vMX100 into Microsoft Azure cloud and build site-to-site and clients VPNs. The setup process on Azure is relatively simple, however, I lost quite a lot of time on basic issues because the documentation provided by Cisco is not 100% accurate. Here are some tips and tricks to save you time.

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BGP full-routes vs partial-routes vs default-route

Image from https://www.cidr-report.org/

The IPv4 full BGP table size is at around 725000 prefix now. This may cause problems for companies who do not have the resources to update or upgrade their edge routers. But, except for Internet transit providers, who does really need to get the full IPv4 BGP table today? And what are the alternatives? Let’s see that in details with some use-cases.

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Cisco Embedded Event Manager (EEM)

EEM

The Cisco Embedded Event Manager or Cisco EEM is a software component of Cisco IOS, IOS-XR, and NX-OS that provides real-time network event detection and onboard automation. EEM allows you to automate tasks, perform minor enhancements and create workarounds and can makes life easier for network operators by tracking and classifying events that take place on a network device and providing actions options for those events.

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Cisco Flexible Netflow configuration

Netflow

Recently, a customer called me to configure Netflow on these routers because he just installed NetFlow Analyzer software from ManageEngine. This software is an “all in one” NetFlow collector, database, WebUI software, able to build pretty nice reports. In my opinion, Netflow is one of the absolutely required software to have a good visibility when you operate a network.

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Extending the LAN with a Meraki wireless mesh link

Meraki_Wireless-Bridge

Cisco Meraki access-points can operate as mesh repeaters, which allows them to extend the wireless network range. Since repeaters also support wired clients plugged into their wired interface, a repeater can be used to bridge a remote LAN segment back to the main network. This article explains how the LAN can be extended via a wireless bridge, including limitations and requirements.

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Building a LACP port-channel between Cisco and Huawei switch

Huawei-Cisco-trunk_topology

Configuring a LACP link aggregation, EtherChannel, or port-channel, or Eth-trunk between Huawei and Cisco switch is something very common. But since the configuration syntax between the two vendors is different, it can be confusing. In this article, I will show how to configure a LACP port-channel – called Eth-trunk on Huawei – properly between a Cisco catalyst switch running IOS or IOS-XE and a Huawei switch, model 6700 in this case.

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Meraki mesh networking tests

Meraki_Wireless-Bridge-3

Wireless mesh networking is included and enabled by default in every Cisco Meraki AP. The goal is to create a self-healing network that is resilient to cable and switch failures. But, how does it works exactly? How does an AP choose between the existing neighbors? How can we monitor the status and performances of a mesh link? And as it is enable by default, is it possible to deactivate this feature?

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